Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein

Hydrolyzed wheat protein is listed in the ingredients of Sally Hansen’s nail strengthener. Does that mean this nail product is not usable since this is not a gluten-free ingredient?

You are right, hydrolyzed wheat protein is not gluten free. But since you do not eat the nail strengthener you can go ahead and use it. Medical experts say gluten protein is too large a molecule to be absorbed through the skin and the same is true of your fingernails. Fingernails are made of a tough protein, called keratin. Only the part of the nail that is under the skin at the base of the nail is living tissue. If you bite your nails, there is a possibility you could swallow some of the nail strengthener. The amount of gluten you would consume would probably be very small. Still, Alessio Fasano, MD, director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland, recommends not using the nail strengthener if you bite your nails. And if worry over this is going to make you bite your nails even more, find a nail strengthener that does not contain hydrolyzed wheat protein.

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  • Lisa Maria Di Mambro

    I have been using a Kerastase product for about 7 weeks and have been having headaches and flu like symptoms.. So I had a look and sure enough it has hydrolysed wheat protein. I have been using it for 6 weeks and have been rather sick, wheezing and cannot get well from a chest cold. My motivation for being more aware was that my doctor asked me to re-search all of my products and foods as it seemed that my immune system was being compromised somehow, typical of an autoimmune response too. Voila! I think I may have found the culprit. Fingers crossed.
    Lisa

  • Tina Brown

    I certainly did! I had an itchy rash on my face, neck and back. I was having all sorts of issues that I knew were related to gluten but I couldn’t figure out from where. I finally found it in my shampoo, conditioner, body scrub, shaving cream, body lotion, hair gel, makeup and lip balm. They all had either or both of Tocopheryl or Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein. I researched them and found out that it is not 100% guaranteed that the gluten is entirely removed when the wheat protein goes through that processing. Also, that 9 times out of 10 when a skin or hair care product says Tocopheryl it is derived from Wheat Germ. I got rid of all the products containing those items and got better. Now, since I eliminated both of them at the same time I don’t know if it was both of them causing the problem or just the Wheat Germ. I don’t care now, I just won’t ever use anything with either of them to be safe.