Gluten-Free Oreos Hitting Shelves in January 2021

If you’ve been missing your favorite sandwich cookie since going gluten free, we’ve got great news for you: regular and Double Stuf gluten-free Oreos will be debuting in January 2021! These new twists on the classic cookie will be permanent additions to the lineup and available wherever Oreo products are sold. What’s more, they’ll cost about the same as traditional Oreos and will be made with real cocoa.

“At Oreo, we take pride in regularly adding new choices and varieties based on what we’re hearing from our fans,” the brand noted in a statement to Food & Wine. “Oreo is always looking to welcome more people to experience the playfulness of Oreo cookies. We have been planning the launch of our Gluten-Free cookies for some time and are excited to give more fans the opportunity to experience the playfulness of Oreo cookies beginning in January 2021.”

 

 
 
 
 
 
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So get some milk ready and start counting down the days until 2021!

Looking for some gluten-free goodies to tide you over in the meantime? Try some of our delicious dessert recipes!

This Week in Gluten-Free News

How to use gluten-free flour blends in your everyday baking

Washington Post: I realize that not every recipe is for every person. Interest, diet, skill, equipment: They’re all variables that make it impossible to please everyone all the time. One of the most common questions I get on my baking recipes is something like this: Can I make this with gluten-free flour? Click here for the full story.

The Best Frozen Gluten-Free Pizzas You Can Order Online

Chowhound.com: Can frozen, ready-to-bake gluten-free pizza that doesn’t taste “like cardboard,” really be possible? The answer is yes—it’s 2020, people, and the internet and a barrage of wheat-free flours has made living gluten-free mean you no longer have to suffer the next time you have a hankering for pizza at 2 a.m. Click here for the full story.

Pepperidge Farm Offers First-Ever Gluten-Free Cookie

Celiac.com: Cookie lovers looking for easy-to-find gluten-free cookies from a trusted brand may rejoice in the news that Pepperidge Farm is rolling out gluten-free cookies for the first time in their 80-plus-year history. Click here for the full story.

Meet Fonio, the Gluten-Free African Super Grain

Celiac.com: What’s fonio and why is it set to take the gluten-free world by storm? In West Africa, fonio is well-known for its great taste and dish nutritional profile. In addition to being a nutritious and great tasting, fonio is a versatile and highly sustainable crop. Fonio does well in dry areas, has low water needs, and grows well without pesticides. Click here for the full story. 

Stonyfield Organic Introduces New Probiotic, Gluten-Free Yogurt

Gluten free and looking for a probiotic fix? Stonyfield Organic now has you covered.

On Jan. 15, the organic yogurt maker announced the launch of Daily Probiotics, a probiotic yogurt drink designed to support both immune and digestive health. Available in two flavors, Blueberry Pomegranate and Strawberry Acai, the new Daily Probiotics include real fruit and organic low-fat milk.

According to Stonyfield, the move follows increasing interest in preventive daily healthcare, which is fueling demand for convenient products made with probiotics. The global probiotics market is predicted to reach nearly 80 billion dollars by 2025.

“Beyond the standard cultures that are required, you may be surprised to learn that many yogurts actually do not contain the probiotic cultures that help support your immune system health,” said Maya Feller, RD. “Studies have shown that eating yogurt rich in probiotics can help foster the beneficial gut bacteria that support an improved immune system by possibly increasing white blood cell counts, so it’s important to look for yogurts that include these specific strains.”

Daily Probiotics shots are USDA Organic, Non-GMO Project Verified and gluten-free. Daily Probiotics shots are available in the yogurt aisle of retailers nationwide in a 3.1oz. 6-pack format for a suggested retail price of $4.49. For more information visit stonyfield.com.

Pepperidge Farm Announces its First Ever Gluten-Free Cookie

Later this month, those living the gluten-free lifestyle will be able to enjoy the latest offering from Pepperidge Farm.

On Wednesday, USA Today reported that the company, founded in 1937, is releasing its first-ever gluten-free product. Pepperidge Farm’s gluten-free Farmhouse Thin & Crispy Milk Chocolate Chip and Butter Crisp cookies will be available in Target, Albertsons, Publix and select grocery stores across the United States.

Look for the cookies in the same aisle where Pepperidge Farm products are sold. The suggested retail price is $3.89, USA Today reports.

Last year, the Girl Scouts of America also jumped into the gluten-free market, releasing its first gluten-free cookie. Read more about that here. 

Is Medicine Gluten Free?

Those new to the gluten-free diet may find it overwhelming when faced with the long list of foods and ingredients that are no longer on the menu. Many may be surprised to discover that some unexpected items, like toothpaste or medicine, may also be on that list.

In fact, some prescription drugs and even non-prescription medication may be made with gluten. Meaning there is a chance they could cause distressing symptoms for those with celiac disease or a gluten intolerance. 

However, there is good news. The majority of medications do not contain gluten, but it’s always smart to take precautions, especially if you’re looking to avoid unwanted symptoms.

Determining whether or not a medication contains gluten can be tricky. Right now, there are no laws in place requiring drug manufacturers to label drugs made with gluten. That could be changing though. In April 2019, U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio introduced a bill into Congress that if passed would require that all medicines containing gluten be labeled as such. Learn more about the bill and how to support getting it made into law here.

According to bill’s sponsors, if passed it “will make it easier to identify gluten in prescription drugs” and “will allow concerned consumers to know, for example, if the starch in their prescription drugs comes from wheat or corn; that small distinction is an important one.”

In the meantime, those concerned about whether or not there’s gluten in their medicine should contact drug manufacturers for more information. Alternatively, a good pharmacist could serve as a valuable resource for figuring out whether gluten was used to make medicine. For more on how your pharmacist can help, see here.

So, just how does gluten get in medication in the first place? While it’s rare for gluten to be used in a medication itself, drug makers may use wheat starch to bind the pills together. These ingredients are called excipients. To avoid ingesting gluten from medication be sure to review a medication’s inactive ingredients and whether or no gluten was used in any of the excipients.

They Served What?! Readers React to Airline Serving Man with Celiac Just Snacks for Long Flight

If you haven’t heard, James Howe, a 39-year-old man with celiac, was given only snacks to get him through 10+ hours on a flight from Mexico to his home in England following his honeymoon. Howe had ordered a full meal long before the flight. He had a lot to say about the incident on his Facebook page. 

“Fabulous way to end our honeymoon,” he said in a lengthy post that called out the airline. 

We asked for your experiences. And you answered with errors, meals of nothing but lettuce and one reader reported receiving a banana wrapped in plastic. You also shared some positive experiences. Read on for more. 

Here’s what else readers are saying:

Jayne Burcombe-King: “I ordered a GF meal. Then when it came to it they didn’t have one for me. So they had to scramble around and take a GF off a passenger who fell asleep.”

Cindy Quadrini: “Happened to me from London to Washington DC. Ordered and confirmed it……”no record of it”. So glad I carry GF snacks with me. Told them I’d just have a ginger ale…..”Sorry, we just handed out the last one”. Not a good flight!”

Sky Vad: “A few months ago, I flew to Mexico by Iberia and despite that I’d selected gluten-free food accordingly with their very strict rules, when I took the flight they gave me VEGETARIAN food by “error” and the assistant told me “what’s the problem? Vegetarian and gluten-free are very similar”… I always take food with me, but is not fair to be 11 hours eating two fruits and some almonds… 😖”

Ulla-Britt Vitus Cowan: “I was served once with an unpeeled Banana wrapped in cling wrap labeled GF.”

Claire Barnes: “Went all the way to Australia and most of the way back on watermelon after my husband spent 45 mins on the phone ordering gf/ veggie meals.”

Carol Mohan: “Even when they do have them, they are often inedible. Try to cover vegetarian, gluten-free and dairy-free in one meal – result cardboard. I usually bring food on longer flights.”

Patricia Bercovich: “Oh yes. Flying from the U.K. to California. Then I ate the fruit salad they scrounged up for me and was severely glutened. I now always bring enough for the flight plus one day, in case of delays.”

Becky Culbertson: “Multiple times in my life. My favorite gluten-free meal on an airline was lettuce (just lettuce, no other veggies and no dressing…. not one drop) it was icky.”

And it’s not just airlines!

Pattie White: “Lol. No. I can’t afford a ten hour flight, but I did spend many nights sitting overnight w hospitalized loved ones without having had anything to eat since lunchtime. Hospitals are not Celiac friendly.”

Carla Rishton: “It wasn’t an airline but I paid for 1st class via a train service and was given popcorn as that was the only gluten-free items available.”

Nonetheless, we did find a few happy endings:

Heather Kramer Mallinger: “Flew quite a bit for work several years ago to Europe, and Delta always had something for me. I did preselect that I was gluten-free. Not to say airlines cant make mistakes, but had great experiences on Delta. I always took extra snacks just in case, and the food wasn’t always the best, but I was happy to get a meal on the long flights.”

Patti Hanisch Townsend: “Air Serbia was amazing, GF meals and snacks both ways.”

Jeanne Leadley: “My personal favorite is when Air France forgot my GF meal. They gave me free champagne and cognac. Who needs food. 😜”

Taking all this into consideration, always bulk up on your favorite GF food before traveling! Airlines do not always follow through on their ability to provide meals for celiacs or restricted diets

Instead of Gluten-Free Meal, Passenger Given Popcorn for 10-Hour Flight

A German-based airline is receiving backlash for reportedly serving a 39-year-old man with celiac nothing but popcorn and potato chips on a 10-hour flight from Mexico to England.

According to reports, James Howe had ordered the airline’s gluten-free meal option when he pre-booked first-class seats for a flight home from his honeymoon in Mexico back in October. Instead of the full meal he was expecting, Howe said he received nothing but snacks.

He posted a photograph of the “meal” along with a message for the airline on Facebook saying:

“Popcorn and crisps to get me through 10+ hours Fabulous way to end our lovely honeymoon. PEOPLE BEWARE if you book a meal “they are subject to availability and nothing is guaranteed.” This is news to me!”

The Mirror reports that an airline spokesperson said Howe has since received an apology.

“We’re very sorry to hear of Mr. Howe’s experience on his journey home from Cancun,” the spokesperson told the Mirror. “We have contacted the customer directly to apologize and offer a gesture of goodwill.”

 

United Airlines Adds Vegan, Gluten-Free In-Flight Dining Options

New vegan, gluten-free and vegetarian options are on the way for United Airlines passengers in 2020 after the company announced an overhaul of its in-flight menu.

The announcement arrived on Oct. 25 during the company’s Flight Plan 2020 event held in Chicago. Amid news that larger planes, the addition of sixty-plus planes to the fleet and technology upgrades were on the way, officials noted that new menu items will be rolled out with health-minded flyers in mind.

United Airlines first introduced gluten-free offerings in 2014. Officials said by focusing on plant-based menu items the carrier is keeping up with the latest food trends. Some of the new menu items set to take flight next year include a vegan stuffed grape leaf with yogurt, red beet hummus with roasted vegetables, and roasted curry cauliflower.

Those with special dietary needs may choose a gluten-free or vegan meal up to 24 hours before takeoff by using the carrier’s mobile application or via the company’s website, United.com. The company has not yet announced when in 2020 the new options will be available. 

According to United Airlines, special meals are available on select routes when breakfast, lunch, or dinner is set to be served. If special meals are available they may be chosen during booking. Generally, special meals are available on most North American premium cabin flights that are more than 2,000 miles in length.

The carrier says special meals are available on all international flights crossing the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The meals are also available on South American flights to and from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Peru.

When United first announced the gluten-free offerings the carrier noted it updated what’s available on its Choice Menu Classic, Savory and Tapas Snack Shop snackboxes. Snack Shop options may be purchased in United Economy on most North and Central America flights scheduled for more than two hours and flights to and from northern South America. Also, United offers fruit and nut bars as a gluten-free Snack Shop à la carte option.

 

Listeria Concern Prompts Nationwide Recall of Over 125 Vegetable Products

Concerns over listeria contamination prompted a recall of more than 125 vegetable products sold to stores nationwide with affected brands including Signature Farms, Del Monte, Marketside and Trader Joe’s.

The products are being recalled voluntarily by Mann Packing Co. who made the announcement on Sunday, Nov. 3. The company is acting “out of an abundance of caution,” according to a press release from Mann Packing. Listeria bacteria can cause serious and, occasionally, fatal infections in children, the elderly or those with compromised immune systems. Healthy people may suffer from high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, and other symptoms. An infection could cause a miscarriage or stillbirth among pregnant women.

So far, health officials in the United States and Canada have not reported any illnesses due to the products listed in the recall.

Recalled products have a “Best If Enjoyed By” date from Oct. 11, 2019, to Nov. 16, 2019. A list of the recalled products is below.

Listeria concerns prompted a recall of more than 125 vegetable products sold to stores nationwide with affected brands including Del Monte and Trader Joe’s.

Anyone who purchased any of the products listed in the recall is advised to dispose of the item. For more information, comments or questions, call Mann Packing Co.’s 24-hour customer service number at 1-844-927-0707 or email: [email protected]

Recalled Items:

Mann Recalled List

VIDEO: World-renowned celiac expert urges caution after cross-contamination study

Researcher, scientist and leading authority on celiac disease Dr. Alessio Fasano has responded to a recent study claiming to find no significant gluten transfer when kitchen appliances and utensils were used for both gluten-free and gluten-containing foods.

In a brief video (see below) posted on YouTube, Fasano, who directs the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital, says the study poses some thought-provoking questions. However, he warns that other factors should be considered.

“There is a cumulative effect of cross-contamination that may eventually break a tolerance…with all the consequences that come with that,” Fasano says in the video.

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The study was conducted by Children’s National Hospital and appeared in the journal Gastroenterology. The authors tested three scenarios where it was thought that gluten transfer could be high enough to pose a gluten exposure risk for someone with celiac disease—in general, greater than 20 parts per million (ppm) or .002%. It found less gluten transfer than expected in several everyday kitchen scenarios.

Fasano, who wrote the landmark 2003 study that established celiac disease affects one in 133 Americans, noted the recent study was not a large one. He stressed that the results should not justify a relaxation in current food preparation guidelines for people with celiac disease. 

“I think it’s very provocative,” Fasano says of the new study in the video. “I think it’s opened up questions that we never ask ourselves, but I personally believe that we have to have a word of caution.”